new use for existing product

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Comments

  • patentandtrademarkpatentandtrademark subscriber Posts: 103
    how much do you want to pay for this pig in my poke?
  • yankeestonkyankeestonk subscriber Posts: 1
    Patenttrademark,
    What do you mean by "how much do you want to pay for this pig in my poke?"
  • patentandtrademarkpatentandtrademark subscriber Posts: 103
    I mean when people are asked to make decisions in the dark, they make unreliable decisions.
  • yankeestonkyankeestonk subscriber Posts: 1
    I am familiar with the phrase, I just don`t know what you mean specific to this discussion
  • drvagdrvag subscriber Posts: 5
      ...You also say someone will likely figure out fairly quickly what you`re doing. So what`s your long-term advantage?How will you maintain your advantage long enough to make a successful, sustainable business out of this?
    Yankee, this is a very imporant question for consideration.
  • yankeestonkyankeestonk subscriber Posts: 1
     
    There are several ways around it. I could add an ingredient of two to the mix for starters. Or I could get the current manufacturer to run with the idea. ( I know that may be near impossible.) I don`t believe this idea is "big enough" that the manufacturer would start competing against "my product" either. I don`t know, that`s what I`m doing here, looking for help and suggestions. It appears that there isn`t a clear line as to whether I can do what it is I want to do here or not, as there seems to be some that think it can be done and some that don`t think it can be done. I`m just trying to find out if it`s legal for me to repackage an existing product for another use, not using the manufacturers name anywhere on the product. The product is not generic in nature like Vinegar. ( my earlier example wasn`t the best ) Think of taking Dawn dishwashing detergent and packaging it to clean car tires. Can you do that if you don`t use the Dawn name and buy the product directly from "Dawn" ( Proctor and Gamble? ) I know it`s hard for anyone to give definitive answers when I can`t tell you exactly what it is I have in mind, and it also makes it worse that their may well be no clear legal answer. Just trying to decide if this is worth putting any money into at all. Thanks all.
  • patentandtrademarkpatentandtrademark subscriber Posts: 103
    we are attempting to talk about some unknown "cleaning product" and offer views about an unknown "new use" in an unknown "niche market."  The point is that if anybody wants specific advice, there needs to be some specific discussions.  I understand the down side of getting specific.  There is also a down side to staying vague.  It`s like asking a dentist "what can I do for this pain in my mouth" without having him look in the mouth.  He can say, "take pain medication" but that`s about it, which may not actually solve the problem.  You might need a filling or root canal.  He just can`t tell you.
  • yankeestonkyankeestonk subscriber Posts: 1
     
    I guess that`s fair enough. However I think the analogeous idea I gave about using Dawn dishwashing Detergent to clean car tires was fairly specific. Can you give an opinion on that? Could someone repackage Dawn D.D. and sell it to clean car tires under a different name? Let`s assume there is a patent on it and that it is in effect. Thanks
  • drvagdrvag subscriber Posts: 5
    Yankee, why don`t you talk with Mr. Lindon privately, discuss with him the specific details, pay him for his time, and then you`ll know if you can at the least do it legally.
    There`s still the bigger question, long-term advantage?
  • yankeestonkyankeestonk subscriber Posts: 1
    drvag,
    I posted on the 14th asking him if he`d be willing to speak with me on retainer specifically about my idea, he didn`t respond. So I`m gathering either he`s too busy, missed the post, or doesn`t want anything to do with it.
    I`ll deal with the long term advantage once I find out if what I`m looking to do is even remotely possible. I`m not "an inventor" by any means. I just stumbled upon a good alternative use for an existing product and want to know if it is even possible to pursue it, or if it is just totally illegal. No one seems to be able to answer that. Even if the answer is "maybe", with a tad bit of an explanation how it might be or might not be, then I`d know whether to start hiring attorney`s and doing searches. Again, you guys are the experts, if this can`t be done, it can`t be done. However I don`t need opinions on whether the product is worth pursuing, because no one but me knows what the product is !
    Thanks again for you help and input.
     
  • drvagdrvag subscriber Posts: 5
    Then, I would consult with a patent lawyer in your area.
    Doug
  • patentandtrademarkpatentandtrademark subscriber Posts: 103
    on Jun. 14, 2007 at 3:30pm I sent a private message to yankeestonk which remains unopened.
  • yankeestonkyankeestonk subscriber Posts: 1
    I`ve never been on this site before, I didn`t even know I had a mailbox. I have now opened it. Thanks. I will contact you as soon as I can determine if what I`m looking to do is even possible. Do you have an opinion if it is or not, or do I have to retain you before you can answer something like that. I was hoping that I could get an idea from this site whether or not the kind of thing I`m looking to do is legal if the product I need to repackage and sell under my own brand for a different purpose than it is currently marketed for. I really don`t want to shell out $500 or so just for you to tell me there`s no way I can do this. ( I got that impression from you "pig in a poke" line ) Thanks
  • patentandtrademarkpatentandtrademark subscriber Posts: 103
    I don`t know the answer.  I think you should ask a lawyer in your local area.  I can`t and won`t guarantee you I would not give you the news that there`s no way you can do "this" - whatever that may be.  If you perceive the answer "no" to be a waste of money, I`m not really sure what else to say.  To know what you CANT do ahead of time is valuable for some people.  It is entirely possible you will hire a lawyer and have the lawyer say "what you are proposing to do is probably illegal."
  • patentandtrademarkpatentandtrademark subscriber Posts: 103
    a forumula is not a work of authorship [like a book] - ergo, no copyright.
     
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