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Logo Design

cslade3cslade3 Posts: 1subscriber
I am creating a website for a company that  I am slowly starting on the side but I am having a hard time making the decision of how to get my companies logo created. I am proficient in Photoshop and have done some web development but do not have the creative ability to do it myself. Can anyone suggest some options for getting my logo created. I am on a tight budget but want the Logo to last for years to come. We are in the field of Sustainable Development and Learning if that helps.
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Comments

  • XpressXpress Posts: 0subscriber
    As an owner of a marketing support business for small-businesses I`m
    involved with logo designs on a regular basis. We offer a logo design
    package for $185. It`s competative with internet design services. To
    make it work we have to have some real involvement from the client. We
    require the client to provide us with several samples of logos they
    like.They need to explain what it is they feel their logo should 
    say about their business. We need feedback about colors, shapes and a
    "look" (old fashion / natural / futuristic /abstract / etc.) that they
    feel conveys what their buiness is about. We do 3 quick ideas based on
    this input. Fron here we narrow the look with one revision and another
    review. We can then move to a final. We do all production in
    Illustrator so that we have a vector version. This vector art can be
    enlarged or srunk so that it can be used in all types of materials. It
    can also be made into a low res version for use on websites.
    In summary:
    Be very clear about what you looking to see.
    Try to find pictures, symbols, other logos that convey a sense of direction or look.
    Make a decision about colors.
    Once you have collected this input it`s less of a mystery about what you want.
    Check with your local colleges to see if there is a student that has a
    flair for design and art who you can hire. Check with your local SBDC
    to see if they have a referal to a local designer who is also starting
    up and can be you hands.
    Send us the job if you can`t find anyone locally, we can use the work.
    Steve Chapman
    XpressMarketing, Inc.
  • LogoMotivesLogoMotives Posts: 15subscriber
    Having designed logos for almost 30 years now, I always suggest that small business owners hire a professional to create the identity for their business, whether they hire me to do the job or not.  In the end - in most cases - you will have a much more polished and effective logo.  It is often very wise to bring someone with a critical eye, real artistic talent, and some emotional "distance" from the actual business into the procedure of creating what will be the most important visual element of your marketing and promotion efforts.One of the most important things is to follow what one of my college professors referred to as The K.I.S.S. Principle -which is Keep It Simple, Stupid.  The most memorable and effective logos are most often the simplest.  A logo does not necessaarily need to say everything about your business.  It should be a very strong invitation to a potential client to want to learn more about what you do, an ever present reminder to existing clients that you are their to serve their needs, and an immediately recognized element of your business image over time.Another important initial consideration is that your logo needs to work in black and white. Even in these days of flashy technology your logo needs convey your image in black and white, or one color, for photocopying, faxing and other needs.  In designing logos, I won`t even add color to a logo design until the client has signed off on the image in black and white. When contemplating color for your finalized logo design don`t simply choose specific colors because you like them.  Give some thought to possible emotional, historic or cultural implications of color.  A great resource for this is the book Blue is Hot, Red is Cool:  Choosing the Right Color for Your Logo by David E. Carter.  For example, something like 60% of all logos contain the color blue.  For me that`s always been a reason to not use blue.Be careful when using online logo design resources for the creation of your business identity.  In many cases, if the price is too inexpensive, you will be getting exactly what you pay for.  Research designers to make sure you will be getting original art created specifically for your own business.  Some designers will simply slap your business name up next to an already existing piece of "clip art" - which may already be in use by other businesses as their logo.  Some web site logo options will offer you a template design for your business.  Again, you risk the possibility of another business having exactly the same logo - with a name change being the only difference.  You want your logo to be a unique representation of your business.  Recently it was discovered that one of the major online discount logo design services - touted by many business publications as a business model for such work - was actually selling some logo designs created by other well-known designers for existing businesses.  In fact, they were even offering the very familar, trademarked Xerox "X" for sale in their menu of available designs as a logo option for a business identity.  So, in those situations, it is "buyer beware."  You really are best off working closely with a talent, skilled professional designer in creating a strong symbol to represent your business. A great deal of the success in creating an effective logo will be due to the personal and professional relationship that develops between designer and client. You might want to read my article  Inspiration, imitation or innovation
    - how do designers create unique identities?
    for some additional thoughts on logo design efforts.Best of luck with your project.- J.
  • NuevolutionNuevolution Posts: 30subscriber
    Honestly, if you are seeking a logo that you can go here and develop your logo in a matter of minutes. http://www.logoyes.com/?bid=18&aid=CD242&opt</A>=
    This is where I send my customers when they are on a budget but want to get nice looking LOGOS, plus you get free business cards with it after you are done.
    Good Luck and tell me if it worked out for you
  • PeerBoardCoachPeerBoardCoach Posts: 0subscriber
    No matter who you choose to create your logo, the most important decision you need to make is about your brand identity - and you need to be crystal clear in your own mind about what that is before you ask someone else to create a visual symbol of that identity.  Don`t confuse your logo with your brand.  Hopefully, you`ve already got this handled, but just in case, I wanted to warn you. 
    I`ve seen so many businesses whose logos have no relationship to what their businesses stand for and, of course, that`s just a symptom of a bigger problem.  They haven`t stopped to clearly define the promise they are making to their customers and potential customers, the words they want to "own" in their customers` minds - in other words, the value they bring to the table that makes them unique from, and better than, their competition in at least one meaningful way.
    Having said all of the above, I also agree with those advocating for use of a professional designer - one who also understands the mechanical side of their designs - that is, what prints well, what prints cheaply, etc.  A design that fails to take real-world applications into account will end up costing you far more than a good designer.
    Good luck!
  • NuevolutionNuevolution Posts: 30subscriber
    True to what PeerBoard Coach said,
    It took me 14 designs, before I made a commitment to my companies Logo. Once I made the commitment and was able to relate my business with the Logo it was easier for me to brand the business. I think before you decide what you want to represent to others, make rough drafts, show them to friends, peers, and others and see what they have to say. Sit back and think to yourself "Is this really how I want people to identify me as" and the image will be much clearer that what you expected.
  • sooonsooon Posts: 5subscriber
    hi,as many years as graphic designer i will give a few advises:1. start with a single colour logo. imagine Apple. it works even with 1 colour.2. at least get a illustrator or vector version for the logo. do some research what is vector graphic and raster graphic. both have pros and cons. photoshop is raster graphic and that is not good enough as for logo.
  • marstonimarstoni Posts: 0subscriber
    Also if you`re on a tight budget and want decent quality I could recommend The Logo Company.  They won overall best in wired magazine.  Take a look: www.thelogocompany.com
  • AronAron Posts: 3subscriber
    My experience has been, you get what you pay for. Big piece of advice - get the "native file" or no deal. Jpegs and PDF`s are great for review but without the native file your hosed if you want to use it on other stuff in the future.
  • VickiJVickiJ Posts: 6subscriber
    What is PMS? (In color terms.) I understood everything else.
  • LogoMotivesLogoMotives Posts: 15subscriber
    Hi all -I thought I would share an additional article about identity design that was just published in a legal industry publication.  While slightly skewed to the audience of law firm administrators, the piece contains a few helpful hints for anyone considering the creation of a new company logo:Tipping the scales toward successful identity design- J.
  • NickNick Posts: 2subscriber
    Hi,We recently did a logo design contest on Sitepoint.com and got about 10-15 different designs.  The winner was to receive $100.  Someone suggested this option to me, and I was skeptical.  But I gave it a whirl, got some bad designs, some good, but one we really liked and ultimately choose for our business.You can check it out at our site, PipelineDeals.com.  The upper left blue/white spiral.  We also have a grey/white one.Its just another option you have outside of the high end professional and in between the logo kit builders.Nick
  • LogoMotivesLogoMotives Posts: 15subscriber
    Hi,We recently did a logo design contest on Sitepoint.com and got about 10-15 different designs.  The winner was to receive $100.  Someone suggested this option to me, and I was skeptical.  But I gave it a whirl, got some bad designs, some good, but one we really liked and ultimately choose for our business.You can check it out at our site, PipelineDeals.com.  The upper left blue/white spiral.  We also have a grey/white one.Its just another option you have outside of the high end professional and in between the logo kit builders.Nick
    An international campaign is now in place to educate both the general public  and graphic designers about such "contests" - which are little more than requests for speculative, or "spec," work.  You can read much more about this effort on the NO!SPEC web site.   Design organizations around the world are taking up this cause in promoting professionalism in our industry.  I am a member of the NO!SPEC committee, made up of designers from around the world.  In addition, I have written about this topic in articles for design industry publications and web sites.  Two of the articles are When a "contest" is not a contest and Say NO!LOGO to speculative "contests" and identity design requests.   - J.
  • NickNick Posts: 2subscriber
    This makes it sound like I committed a crime.  Startups often can`t afford the $ to work with and receive multiple designs from one or more firms.I don`t think there is anything wrong with asking designers to compete for business.  Small companies and even large often do business development work for free or on spec if you will.  Why?  Well, of course in hopes of it paying off in a long term relationship.My logo contest resulted in $ for a firm.  Any by the way, I may give that firm more $ for additional design work.
  • LogoMotivesLogoMotives Posts: 15subscriber
    I don`t think there is anything wrong with asking designers to compete for business.  Small companies and even large often do business development work for free or on spec if you will.
    Designers should compete for business - based on the quality of existing work in their portfolio of past design efforts, not on the request for new design work with the possibility of being selected for compensation.  That is the basic premise of the NO!SPEC campaign.  In how many other industries are individuals asked to do the service requested and the customer will decide afterwards whether to pay the individual (and accept the work) or not?  It seems to be limited to the creative professions (at times in the design, advertising, architecture and similar fields) for some reason.  Doing business in such a manner doesn`t seem to be acceptable to doctors, dentists, lawyers, and most other professions.  The design profession is finally standing up for themselves and letting potential customers know that business will not be done in such a manner any longer.  My post was simply meant to be part of the education process that is taking place on an international scale.- J.
  • keyconkeycon Posts: 34subscriber
    Amen, Jeff!
    It always amazed me (when I had staff and doing creative work) how people wanted "spec" work. Glad to hear the creative world is banning together to educate and stop the practice.
    [email protected]
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