Your Impressions of this Package Idea

stevesteve Posts: 14subscriber
edited March 2007 in Marketing
More than one
person has said the second sale will be no problem. The taste of our
cookies will take care of that. We need to concentrate on getting the
first sale. Our packaging has to take care of that. I`d appreciate some
feedback on a package design. Here`s a little bit of the thinking behind it.

I want our
package to be unlike anything currently on the gluten free cookie
shelf. Many packages look very busy. I want ours to be clean,
minimalist, modern. I wanted most of the text to be subdued so after it
has been read it will allow the brand and flavor text to take over.

We don`t have a
lot of room to work with on a cookie package. Ours will be about 3
inches wide by 9 inches high. I`d like our package to tell some of our
story. We`re not some mega-corporation, we`re a couple working together
trying to improve people`s lives by making food they really want to
eat. My wife has celiac disease and that`s our
target market. They`ll be able to relate to the frustration she felt
with most products out there. It`s also important that we mention the
fact that our products are made in a dedicated gluten free facility.
Some aren`t.

In order for you to see the formatting I put a Word doc of my package idea on my web server. What do you think?

Comments

  • stevesteve Posts: 14subscriber
    This is just the package front. The ingredients and nutritional info
    will be on the back. Also, this is just a concept. We`ll work with a
    designer to do the actual package design.

    I understand the concerns you raise but I believe there`s a valid reason for each decision made.


    I agree that it`s a lot of words. The goal is for it to be like a
    conversation, not a list of bullet points. I`m not sure how well it
    comes across on a monitor, also there are limitations to Word as a
    design tool, but the body of text would be very subdued.

    One thing you have to remember is that our customer, if they have been
    eating gluten free for any length of time, has been often disappointed
    with products they`ve bought. So disappointed that after spending
    150-200% what a standard wheat based product costs, they take a few
    bites and throw the rest away because it is inedible. They vow never to
    buy that product again and go back to making it themselves, doing
    without or eating the product that is least objectionable to them. They
    also tell their network of friends about their experience. I have to
    start the conversation in the store in order to make the initial sale.
    There will be plenty of opportunities to get them to the website. The
    first time they see our package in a store and pick it up, I have to
    make them think "these people know what I`m going through." For a
    person with celiac disease, shopping is not a "breeze in, grab
    something, breeze out" type of thing. Our customers are used to reading
    labels in the store. Normally they`re looking  out for ingredients
    that will make them sick. The 30 seconds it takes to read our package
    is nothing to them.

    I`ve read so many books lately that they start to run together. I
    believe it was Guy Kawasaki that said you have to give people something
    to work with if you want them to be your product evangelists. In my
    opinion there`s not a mass-market, gluten free snack product out there
    that even tries to form a relationship with the customer.
  • LisaLLisaL Posts: 0subscriber
    I agree with nhgnikole`s comments.

    I understand that you want to tell your story. And it`s worth telling.
    However, in package design your number one goal is to get the attention
    of your prospective buyer. They need to notice the package on the shelf
    before they will pick it up and read your story. TRUST the graphic
    designer you hire to tell your story while also helping to SELL your
    product. That`s what we do.

    Good luck to you.
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