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Has anyone tried to DEVELOP A WEBSITE FROM SCRATCH?

ChallengeUrselfChallengeUrself Posts: 6subscriber
Hello All,
    I am in a process of building my own website. Actually, after thinking for quite sometime and also considering the responses to my earlier topic--I have almost made up my mind to either learn how to develop a sophisticated website or get a business partner who knows how to develop it. 
 So if anyone has ever tried or has information on the above methods (learning or finding a business partner) please do respond. I will greatly appreciate your time and support.
Like if you have learnt ( taken some courses or workshops) how to develop your website --what was the experience like? How much time did it take for you to completely master the art (if you give your full time to it)? If it was paid course, how much did it cost you? Where u satisfied with the knowledge and tools available?
Thanks for your precious time,
Priya

Comments

  • WeblineWebline Posts: 13subscriber
    Depending on what you want to add into your website will partly determine how long it takes you to learn how to code it and put it together. If you want static html pages, the learning time is much shorter that creating something with databases, dynamic content, memberships, etc.
    You can cut this down by using premade systems like CMS`s, blog software, etc,. but that is only if they actually do what you want.
    Personally, everything I learned was by looking around the net, testing free code and scripts, research .... basically, search/trial/error. I think you need to decide if you want to spend the time and money on courses to build one website, or take the time to research on your own.
  • nevadasculnevadascul Posts: 3subscriber
    If you are going to do it yourself, why not use one of the website builders already available.  There are a number of free website builder site available that offer a wide range of features.  Yahoo Sitebuilder is one that comes to mind.  But, there are many more on the Internet.
  • ChallengeUrselfChallengeUrself Posts: 6subscriber
    Thanks to all you helpful people--I greatly appreciate your time and advice. I will definitely look into all the resources you have suggested!
    Thanks,
    Priya
  • ChallengeUrselfChallengeUrself Posts: 6subscriber
    Hey CriticalMass,
     That is exactly what i intend to do--save and also learn something new!!!
    Thanks,
    Priya
  • CasiCasi Posts: 5subscriber
    Hello.  I used Dreamweaver CS3 to build my site (signature link) and I never had any prior web experience.  Granted - I don`t use any databases or fancy scripts but I think this software works well for basics and for beginners.
  • MattThomasMattThomas Posts: 2subscriber
    It really depends on what it is you are looking to do. Either way, if you are going to build your website yourself, your best bet is to hand code it - it gives you the most control over your site, your code will be a lot cleaner than something that is made through a WYSIWYG editor, and you will have a much better understanding of what each line of code does.
    What I have found is that the more you know, the easier it becomes to learn even more. So if you have no experience with HTML, learning that might take a little bit of time, but once you know that, learning the likes of CSS will become even easier (after years of on and off work with HTML, I resolved to learn CSS, which only took me a day at that point).
    I don`t have much experience with PHP and the like, but what I have seen is that its not difficult to understand once you get the hang of web development.
    Bottom line, if you are good technical thinker and learn these type of things quickly, consider coding yourself. But if you have the money, you would be better off hiring someone.
    Also, the Wordpress recommendation might be a good idea for you, depending on what specifically you are looking to do.
  • jhalejhale Posts: 0subscriber
    Hey guys - I`m new to this so please excuse my niavity.  I am set on building my own web site, and like Pyria, a little in the dark.  I am not just looking to build a "web page" but a store.  I don`t have a lot of cash so I need to do this as cheaply as possible.  Besides that I do not want to go to an outside source because I will need to know how to do the required maintenance, etc.
     
    Nvu from Mozilla and Word Press were mentioned in the conversations.  These are new names for me.  Can you tell me a little more about these?  Are there any suggestions on which soft ware are appropriate and user friendly for on-line stores?
  • vwebworldvwebworld Posts: 40subscriber

    Hey guys - I`m new to this so please excuse my niavity.  I am set on building my own web site, and like Pyria, a little in the dark.  I am not just looking to build a "web page" but a store.  I don`t have a lot of cash so I need to do this as cheaply as possible.  Besides that I do not want to go to an outside source because I will need to know how to do the required maintenance, etc. Nvu from Mozilla and Word Press were mentioned in the conversations.  These are new names for me.  Can you tell me a little more about these?  Are there any suggestions on which soft ware are appropriate and user friendly for on-line stores?  There are a number of ecommerce programs. ZenCart and osCommerce are free and open source. Nvu or Worpress are not ecommerce programs and usually would not be used to install or manage your ecommerce store. Of course there are all in one solutions where you pay $xx per month (like yahoo stores, etc). In the short-term it may be "cheaper" to go with an all-in-one solution because you "only" pay $xx per month. But in the long run it would be cheaper to use a program that can be put on the web hosting of your choice and allows you to move your site if needed. Let me just say that you can still hire a third party (designer) to install and set up your store AND also learn the required maintenance of it... for day to day operations, add change, edit products and prices, etc.   ~Rolandvwebworld2/9/2009 11:45 AM
  • CasiCasi Posts: 5subscriber
    Hello.
     
    I am by no means an expert but I found a good solution (for my needs) using PayPal and a shopping cart service called AuctionInc.   It was very easy to use.  But ofcourse, this is assuming that you already have a website.   As far as that goes, maybe there are pre-made templates that fit your needs.
     
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