Looking to Reach a Non-Tradional Gaming Market

nothinglikeitnothinglikeit subscriber Posts: 27
edited March 2007 in Business Planning
I`m an indie game developer. Which means that my games are not yet influenced by market factors, publishers, or financing. I basically create what I believe is a need in the market, as well as a game I`m passionate about creating. Traditionally games budgets have ballooned and the games themselves have become more sophisticated. It`s gotten to the point where a lot of time required to create them and lot of time and money is required to play them. (600.00 for a Playstation 3? Anyone interested?.) As a busy worker/college student I don`t have the required time or money to play said games. I saw that there was a need to create shorter gaming experiences for today`s busy adults. The aim is to make games that cost less to make; and more importantly, cost less and require less time for the end user. My target market are current and former hardcore gamers. These are guys and gals that are into playing games for 5-15 hours a week. But since they may have other obligations (family, work, school) and can`t spend the same amount of time or money on gaming that they once could.My question is: I know that I can reach them online via my website and other online sources. But I`m wondering if I can successfully market to them in "Real World" places where these busy people frequent daily. So far I`m thinking about having game demo CDs on counters at independent Coffee shops or Internet cafes. But I`m unsure how receptive my target market would be to having games available in places their not used to.

Comments

  • nothinglikeitnothinglikeit subscriber Posts: 27
    Thanks Steve. It`s funny you mentioned the Wii. I had the idea to offer games outside of the current offerings a couple of years ago. Hence the name Nothing Like It Games. Over the past few years the idea has been kicking around in my head to do Short Form or Episodic  Games. It was spurred by own lack of money to supe up my PC to play Doom 3. Or the time to finish Final Fantasy 12. I`m just getting to the point where the idea is solidifying. So when I saw things like the Wii beating out the Xbox 360 with great game play instead of flashy graphics (I still like jaw dropping graphics by the way) I said `yes` things like this will get people to understand electronic games as more than just a medium for teenage boys. Add to the fact that the game developers themselves are crying out for shorter games.  The guy who was responsible for Halo lamented the fact that he doesn`t have time to play games much because he`s married with two kids; echoed my own sentiments as a busy college student. So I think there`s definitely a need, maybe not screaming yet but I`m glad it`s not that obvious. ( more for me hopefully)That`s enough of my soap box rant.But it`s funny that you mentioned that a game offering at a coffee shop should be communal. My first few game offerings were intended to be single player in nature and probably running the risk of making people even more anti social. I think there`s room for both. (Single player games for the person that doesn`t want to be bothered, A multi player component for a group of friends). I  think that offering games in meeting places like this will also help bring back public gaming almost like modern arcades.
  • Wirehead321Wirehead321 subscriber Posts: 0 Member
    Hi, Marvin,I was looking at your post. I was a game developer for Midway some years ago. We did some usual but successful marketing. One we went to the major Sci-fi conventions. And created a gaming room with our games. Last year Xbox sent games to the Anime Central con in Chicago the attendence was over 13,000. Also I am part of a anime group at meetup.com we play gamesand watch anime at coffee house. In fact I was in a Borders Books yesterday and there was a gaming group meeting and playing. You could also go to icv2.com this site is for retailers looking to see what games are being played. They will even  sent you a guide to the top games just by emailing  your name and address. My other company Tomatovision TV works with EB Games and others to promote games toys and other collectibles. We also  consult with companies  looking for a niche in the collectibles market. If this is helpful or you need some more ideas. I am here to help
  • nothinglikeitnothinglikeit subscriber Posts: 27
    That`s awesome Wirehead321! I actually wanted to work for Midway but I like the idea of doing my own games a whole lot better. But I`m rooting for Midway to do well, because personally I would love to see Chicagoland become a new market for game development companies and talent. But I had a question for you? Are outlets like KB and EB willing to carry games from an unknown, self published indie? I know that the retail field is dominate by publishing Giants but I heard about how gaming companies could approach individual store owners and get their games carried there. Granted this was the 80s but I don`t see why it has to be any different today. I`m thinking of going to events like ACEN and the like and passing out demos, is there like a list of local comic conventions anywhere online?
  • Wirehead321Wirehead321 subscriber Posts: 0 Member
    That is a good idea for your games. I would go to www.ICV2.com they have listings of all comic book cons around the country. And like me they work with companies who want to get into the collectibles market. You can present your game to them. See if you canbe listed in the Retailers magazine that goes out to comic and gaming stores around the country. Then there is Electronic Gaming Magazine a good source for new games. If I give any more information I have to sign you up as client.By the way what type of games is this.RPG, Action, media related. Just want to know. There many routes you can take. Let me know if this helps.
  • nothinglikeitnothinglikeit subscriber Posts: 27
    Than you Howard.
     
    I am a long way off from needing an advisor as I am still bootstrapping it. But when I look into expanding into a full fledged studio your experience could be helpful.  The biggest bellwhether will be to see if my episodic idea will take. I know that it`s becoming accepted as a content delivery model in adventure games such as Sam and Max. But Action games like what I`m working on possess it`s own challenge.
  • Wirehead321Wirehead321 subscriber Posts: 0 Member
    That`s great so you are looking to create a game that would play like an episode  TV something that is very big on cell phones. That`sa good market to  try. Create a java brew based game sell it first has a download on a website to a phone then see what your sells are then expand into a full game. This way you can test your market without a lot of funds. Can your game be design for cell phone use? 
  • nothinglikeitnothinglikeit subscriber Posts: 27
    Sure it can.  I haven`t given cell gaming much of a thought. I`m hearing so many doom and gloom stories about how hard it is yada yada yada. Despite the fact that the bigger boys are now making cell games. There`s some hurdles to cell gaming but i probably have a better shot at that than say a console. (In the beggining at least) I have to get some cell phone programmning under my belt first though.
  • Wirehead321Wirehead321 subscriber Posts: 0 Member
    There are some differences to cell gaming, but it is the fastest growing of the gaming market at over $5 billion worldwide in sells. The reason I ask is I have an Indian developer that could design the game for you at a minium price. His company only designs for cell phone use. Think it over and get back to me.
  • nothinglikeitnothinglikeit subscriber Posts: 27
    cool That`s awesome Howard. I will have to let you know about that. I really want to keep the product in house and get a handle on the pc development first before expanding though. 
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