(Untitled)

deboard3699deboard3699 subscriber Posts: 1
edited August 2007 in Selecting a Business
I am new to this community and I am a chronic entrepreneur at heart with a book full of ideas. I keep telling myself I will wait for the right moment in my life. Well I turn thirty in six months and I don`t really thing there will ever be a "right moment". I have flexibility, no children, and a supportive family and husband. What am I waiting for?
I will start with the idea I think would be the lowest overhead and easiet to get started. I am from a small town and have identified a need for a concierge service. Catering2Convenience with a list of menu items. I have`nt decided if this would a be a membership based model or a service oriented business for: cleaning, pet sitting, catering (a passion of mine), errands, personal assistant, etc.
Do you think this is viable? I`m just at the beginning stages.. but passionate about what I do and I love helping others.
Any advice would be great!!deboard36992007-8-30 16:32:29

Comments

  • deboard3699deboard3699 subscriber Posts: 1
    Thank you so much for the advice and encouragement! I really appreciate the connection to the Charlotte business. I can`t find any around here so I think I might be on to something!
    Thanks again!
  • deboard3699deboard3699 subscriber Posts: 1
    Since I have the flexibility is it advisable to start this up part-time? I can find relatively cheap office space in the area, but is that bad and jump starting too soon?
    I don`t think I am as exposed to someone taking the name if I do a sole prop. vs. an LLC option....
    My brain is going ninety miles an hour and I`m afraid I`m getting ahead of myself.
  • ToddFToddF subscriber Posts: 3
    I`m with NHG on this, get that plan going and start it up. Your welcome to sit on the sidelines if you want but at some point, don`t you want to actually play the game! Thats where all the fun is! It`s NOT going to be easy, but from your post you have support from the family. Don`t wait because you`ll really kick yourself when some competitor comes in and starts offering what you thought of. ToddF2007-8-31 13:29:20
  • MNGrillGuyMNGrillGuy subscriber Posts: 2 Member
    I`d want to make sure the small town has enough wealthy people who could afford something like this.  I`m from a small town (<1000) and very few people had money to spend in this way.  I`d say you`d want a maket at least  >50,000 people. 
  • deboard3699deboard3699 subscriber Posts: 1
    Thanks again for the suggestions and thoughts
    To answer the question regarding market.. market is >50,000 people and I am specifically looking at partnering with a resort property nearby that is very popular. In recent years the town has several commuters since it is a satelite town (within 45-50 minutes) to a major metropolitan area. This is what drove me to choose this idea over the others, which would require more startup $$.
    I still have a ton of research to complete - this is the most helpful place I have found for information.
    Any ideas on how long it takes from inception to launch?
  • deboard3699deboard3699 subscriber Posts: 1
    Should have added another question.. Is it bad to start networking with these businesses before there is a business in place??
  • RetiredMemberRetiredMember subscriber Posts: 0
    Post removed.OldNikko2007-9-3 0:17:57
  • donielledonielle subscriber Posts: 0
    Sounds like a great idea--I agree with the previous posts about doing your due diligence with a business plan. However, just because you are in the process of writing your plan doesn`t mean that you can`t start laying your foundation. The resort that you are talking to is probably a great source of information. You can find out from them what types of services people are asking about that the resort doesn`t offer.  If you can become the best (and maybe only) person doing that you will have a great customer base to begin to sell other services too. Also, I would think that you could also create a package of services that allows people to really relax because everything else is taken care of...just a thought!Good luck!
  • HelenSHelenS subscriber Posts: 0
    Just a followup to the Health Department comment  Some cities allow you to cook in your own kitchen but others require a commercial kitchen outside of your home if you are catering.  Some businesses  have commercial kitchen space that they are not using full time and you can rent on an as needed basis. Some health food stores with kitchens also rent them out on certain days or times.  Check around and see if you can rent a part time kitchen while you are getting started. Doing that would let you avoid renting space full time until the business can support the rent and the purchase of all the commercial kitchen equipment.(second hand kitchen equipment stores are great places to look). If that is not an option maybe you could find a like minded person (who wanted to start a homemade salsa or jam and jellies business) and you could share the expense of the kitchen.Working from home as long as possible gives you a chance to spend money on other things like advertising.
    Best wishes for your new venture
     HelenS2007-9-6 18:6:15
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